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20121223
20121223
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the washington cathedral, it was his really earliest political inspiration. both the president and senate majority leader reflecting on daniel inouye both a long time legislator but two days they will be getting back to work on the fiscal cliff. >> heather: the difficult job of reporting from hawaii, thank you so much, ed. >> gregg: the mother of john hammer telling her son is now in a louisiana hospital. he was released from a mexican prison last week after months behind bars. mexican authorities arrested him after he carried an antique shotgun into their country, even though he says he legally declared the weapon and had a permit for it. today his dad reportedly brought him to the emergency room during their drive back together to florida. his family reported he had a stomach flu of some sort. earlier his mother was clearly relieved to hear that her son was on american soil. >> it was like my first night that i slept all night long without getting up. it was just the thought of not wondering what is going on with him. can anyone hurt him? he is eating and he is able to actually have a m
at schools we are learning more about adam lanza. the washington post today has a quote from his former first grade teacher who says there was a quiet depth to him that i couldn't penetrate. let's bring in national political reporter and bob franken, a syndicated columnist. welcome to both of you. before we get started i want to play you more on the interview on "meet the press" this morning. >> if it is crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children then call me crazy. i will tell you what the american people, i think the american people think it is crazy not to do it. it is the one thing that would keep people safe and the nra is going to try to do that. >> immediately following the interview new york senator chuck schumer called wayne lapierre tone deaf. what do you make of the discussion that the nation and the lawmakers are having around gun control especially considering how often these conversations seem to flare up after something horrible like this and fade just as quickly? >> it does fade just as quickly because the gun lobby terifies any p
of u.s. security agents. benghazi, tripoli and washington coordinated effectively with each other on the night of the attacks. the interagency response was timely and appropriate. but there was not enough time for u.s. military forces to have made a difference. having said that, it is not reasonable nor feasible to tether u.s. forces at the ready to respond to protect every high risk post in the world. we have found that there was no immediate tactical warning of the september 11 attacks. if there was a knowledge gap in the intelligence community's en understanding of extremist militias in benghazi -- in this context, increased violence .ailed to com we did not find that any individual u.s. government employee engaged in willful misconduct or knowingly ignored his or her responsibilities. we did conclude that certain state department bureau level senior officials in critical positions of authority and responsibility in washington demonstrate a lack of leadership and management ability a program for senior ranks and their responses to security concerns posed by the special mission.
for watching "state of the union." have a safe holiday season. i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for extras. for all of us at state of the union, again, we want to wish you a merry christmas and happy holiday season. fareed zakaria "gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and president obama's former budget czar peter orzack, among others. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it's not brazil. much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choic
spending and raise taxes. what will happen? national correspondent live in washington with the details. good morning, steve. >> good morning, eric. the two sides in the fiscal cliff debate had their say before heading home for christmas, but no deal of course. after house speaker john boehner called off his push for a plan b last week saying the ball is now in the democrats' court. there has been no movement toward any deal. democrats want tax hikes for the wealthy. republicans want spending cuts. and some in the gop say the president doesn't want to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> when i listen to the president, i think the president is eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. i think he sees a political victory at the bottom of the cliff. he gets all of this additional tax revenue for new programs and he gets to cut the military which democrats have been calling for for years and he gets to blame republicans for it. >> president obama for his part said he is optimistic a deal can still be reached. he spoke at the white house friday before leaving for hawaii where he is now. but
in washington has been a major impediment and a lot of people believe that nobody should be treated involuntarily. well, that flies in the face of the fact that we treat people with active tuberculosis involuntarily when they won't take medicine. we also restrict people who have alzheimer's disease and don't know they're sick. so, we do this for other conditions, but we have a lot of trouble thinking through this clearly for people with severe mental illness. >> paul: you mentioned in your op-ed for us, the number of activity psychiatric beds has declined from more than half a million to fewer than 50,000. i guess this is part of that movement you're describing against incarcerating the mentally ill, but you're saying that that decline in those beds has endangered the american public? >> it has, because if you try to get somebody who needs hospitalization into a hospital today, it's virtually impossible. as one of my colleagues says, it's easier to get somebody into harvard than it is a mental hospital. we have only one out of the 20 beds that we had 50, 60 years ago, given the incr
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)